WILSON, John




Author Tags: Biography, Fiction, Kidlit & Young Adult, War

John Wilson knows his history and he knows his storytelling. Somebody should have given Wilson a literary prize long before now. But he's not much of a hobnobber over there on Vancouver Island, and so he persists, under-recognized.

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 2, 1951, John Wilson, author of approximately forty books, grew up on the Island of Skye and in Paisley, near Glasgow. His parents had lived most of their lives in India. He earned his Honours B.Sc. in Geology from St. Andrew's University and went to work for the Geological Survey of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). Unwilling to consider military service there, he eventually resettled in Calgary, working in gas and oil exploration.

In 1986, as a geologist in Edmonton, John Wilson decided he wasn't travelling enough, so he sold his sports car, took a leave of absence and began to travel around the world, His grand tour took him to Japan, Thailand, Egypt, Greece, Italy, France and Spain. When he returned home, he had difficulty readjusting to the routine of a regular work schedule. A feature article he had sold to The Globe and Mail sparked a desire to write, so he quit his job and became a full-time freelance writer.

From 1995 to 2003, John Wilson published 16 titles, including one adult novel. He also published more than 300 feature articles and essays, 30 poems and numerous book reviews. Wilson has taught English at Malaspina University-College in Nanaimo and he gives readings and workshops at schools and conferences across Canada. He specializes in making history come alive for kids.

In Wilson's Flames of the Tiger (Kids Can 2003 $7.95), a German teenager seduced by the pomp of Hitler’s rise is called upon to fight. With Berlin in ruins and the Russian army on its way, he helps a badly wounded Canadian soldier, telling the man his life story to help keep him conscious. As dawn breaks, the soldier recovers and helps Dieter and his sister survive. Details in Flames of the Tiger—like flaming horses running in terror and a soldier’s description of Belsen—are not for the squeamish.“It is not my intention to apologize for the Nazis,” says Wilson. “They, and particularly the SS, richly deserve the abhorrence that the civilized world feels for the values they held and the atrocities they committed. What I have tried to do is imagine what it was like for those who came of age in the 1930s and ‘40s, indoctrinated from earliest days and swept up in circumstances they could never understand. To have been a teenager in Nazi Germany must have been immensely difficult, and to expect one to have had a rational post-war perspective is unreasonable. The lure of uniforms and flags and the flood of propaganda must have been next to irresistible. Dieter is probably exceptional for questioning as much as he does.”

Wilson says if there’s an underlying message for his adventure story, it’s to always question what people tell you is a self-evident truth, especially when everyone tells you the same thing.

Set during the American Civil War, The Flags of War (2004) concerns two cousins, one American and one Canadian. As the son of a plantation owner, Nate McGregor fights for the South; whereas his cousin Walt in Canada opposes slavery. When a Confederate ship named the Trent, with British envoys aboard, is seized by the Union, Britain and her colonies are on the verge of joining the American Civil War and fighting for Dixie--and this puts Canada in danger of an invasion from the Union Army. The lives of the cousins become linked by a runaway slave named Sunday from Nate's father's plantation. John Wilson's sequel Battle Scars (2005) occurs after the Battle of Shiloh when both Sunday and Walt, who have both re-enlisted, meet Nate at the Libby prison in Virginia where Nate is a guard. Under these grim circumstances, the guard, the prisoner and the slave must reconcile their personal, political and racial differences.

Set during the battle and siege of Stalingrad during 1942-1942, Four Steps to Death (Kidscan $19.95) revisits the horrific encounter between the troops (and egos) of Hitler and Stalin. The 229-day impasse resulted in more than one million deaths and was a crucial turning point in World War II, after which the Germans never won a major battle. John Wilson revisits the city now known as Volgograd through the experiences of a German tank commander, a patriotic Russian soldier and an eight-year-old boy named Sergei who tries to survive in the rubble. In an afterword, Wilson notes the starving and freezing remnants of the German army under Field Marshall von Paulus finally surrendered on February 2,1943. "The dead were burned in piles on the open steppe and the survivors marched off to a captivity from which few returned," he writes. The Battle of Stalingrad remains under-acknowledged in the West because American, British and Canadian troops did not participate.

Having introduced numerous young protagonists who are caught within complex political situations aboard, John Wilson brought his formula for educational and engaging Young Adult fiction closer to home with Red Goodwin (Ronsdale $9.95), an introduction to the life and times of labour leader Ginger "Red" Goodwin, the Socialist folk hero who was forced to seek refuge in the woods around the coal mining community of Cumberland. After his father is killed in World War I, young Will Ryan is sent to live with his uncle, a mine manager at Cumberland. Will Ryan's chance meeting with the outlaw Red Goodwin in the forest prompts him to consider the legitimacy of the miners' unionist activities and Goodwin's radical view that the conflict between Britain and Germany has capitalist origins. Along the way Will befriends a Chinese boy and learns about racism, and he falls in love with a beautiful Scottish girl whose family is helping Goodwin survive in the woods.

In The Alchemist’s Dream, John Wilson revisits Henry Hudson’s doomed quest to discover a northwest passage to the Far East. In this story, the Nonsuch returns to London in 1669 with a load of fur and the lost journal of the missing explorer Hudson who disappeared in 1611. "In the hands of a greedy sailor, the journal is merely an object to sell," according to the publisher's promo material. "But for Robert Bylot — a once-great maritime explorer — the book is a painful reminder of a past he’d rather forget. As Bylot relives his memories of a plague-ridden city, of the mysterious alchemist John Dee, and of mutiny in the frozen wastes of Hudson Bay, an age-old mystery is both revealed and solved."

Shot at Dawn (Scholastic, 2011) is the World War I tale of a soldier named Allan McBride, who has fought in some of the war's bloodiest battles and seen his best friend killed, but now stands accused of desertion and may face death by firing squad.

Written in Blood (Orca 2010) is the first installment of the Desert Legends Trilogy re-examining the legend about the infamous American outlaw known as Billy the Kid. In the second novel, Ghost Moon, Wilson follows young James Doolen's story after he discovers the terrible truth about his father in Written in Blood. According to publicity materials, "The year is 1878, and young Jim is not yet ready to return to Canada. Instead he heads up to New Mexico in hopes of finding work and building a life. On the way he meets Bill Bonney (later to be known as Billy the Kid), who takes him to a ranch south of the town of Lincoln, where they both find work as cowboys. Little does Jim know that he is about to get caught up in a vicious battle for the lucrative army contracts with nearby Fort Stanton. As the violence explodes around him, Jim becomes a helpless witness to cold-blooded murder and watches as Bill swears revenge and leads a gang of killers into the hills. However hard he tries, Jim can't escape the violence and is finally drawn into its bloody conclusion on the streets of Lincoln."

In Wilson’s third installment, Victorio’s War (Orca $12.95), Jim is an army scout in a war to force Victorio’s Apaches onto a reservation, far from their traditional lands. Captured by his nemesis Ghost Moon and forced to flee with an Apache band of warriors, Jim is only saved from a slow and torturous death when his old friend Wellington adopts him as his son. Will he be branded a traitor? Or killed in a battle with the 10th US Cavalry or the Mexican Army? There’s a mini-series in here somewhere, perhaps to be called Divided Loyalties.

Wilson's Failed Hope (Dundurn, 2012) links with two previous books, Desperate Glory (Napoleon, 2008) and Bitter Ashes (Napoleon, 2010), covering the history of the 20th century from 1914 to 1945.

A dinosaur dig on farmland owned by the hippie-ish mother of teenager Sam unearths more trouble than anyone bargained for in John Wilson’s Bones (Orca Currents 2013), for reluctant readers. Set in the Alberta badlands, near Drumheller, it offers surprisingly sophisticated dialogue and a frighteningly intelligent girlfriend named Annabel who often makes Sam feel inadequate. Ever-prolific, Wilson simultaneously refined contents from his adult book on the doomed Franklin Expedition for a junior audience version with Graves of Ice: The Lost Franklin Expedition, George Chambers The Northwest Passage, 1845 (Scholastic 2014). Long fascinated with the Franklin Expedition, Wilson was prompted by the 2014 discovery of the Erebus to write a third mystery featuring Sam and Annabel, Lost (Orca 2016), in which the come across a priceless artifact that could hold the answer to the Franklin expedition mystery. Lost is a follow-up in a trilogy that includes Bones and Stolen.

In Broken Arrow (Orca $10.95) Steve’s plan for a relaxing vacation under the Spanish sun with his friend Laia, ends abruptly when he receives an email from his brother linking their grandfather to shadowy international plots involving nuclear bombs. Was Steve’s grandpa a cold war era spy? In a desperate attempt to find out, Steve and Laia crack mysterious codes, confront violent Russian mobsters, dodge spies, unearth a bomb and avoid nudists. The deeper they look, the more Steve begins to wonder, whose side was Grandpa on?

In Wilson's follow up The Missing Skull Steve is none too thrilled to be visiting his grandfather at a remote lake in northern Ontario. He resents the fact that his twin brother, DJ, got to go to Central America instead. However, things become interesting when his Grandpa offers up the unsolved death of Tom Thomson and his stolen skull. This is a mystery suited for aspiring detective Steve as he follows a trail of clues set up by his Grandpa in a game of intrigue that leads to Steve's own adventure.

In a series for young adults, John Wilson imagines the bloody trenches of WWI through the eyes of 15-year-old Jim Hay for And In the Morning: Fields of Conflict—The Somme (Heritage $12.95) As a boy, he impatiently waits for the day he can join the men, march off to war and fight for his country. To Jim, war will be a glorious adventure filled with acts of courage and heroic quests. When his big moment for enlistment arrives, following his father’s death in battle and his mother’s nervous breakdown, Jim leaps at the opportunity to escape from the realities of life. And In the Morning reveals how naïve dreams of glory can quickly be obliterated by the ugliness and death at the core of war’s reality. Jim’s longing for adventure is quickly replaced by a battle to survive.

John Wilson revisits World World I for his 40th book, A Dangerous Game (Doubleday 2016), which pays tribute to the resistance and spy network in Belgium called Le Dame Blanche. This name 'The White Lady' was derived from a legend that predicted the fall of the German monarchy would occur with the appearance of a woman dressed all in white. By the end of the First World War, there were an estimated 13,000 agents in this underground resistance network, including many girls and women. His protagonist is a teenaged student nurse, Manon, who enjoys cycling into beautiful Bruges. After she becomes a conduit for information to the British, she uncovers crucial details about where deadly German weaponry is stored--only to discover that innocent people are being killed on both sides of the front. Always realistic and well-researched, Wilson's novels for young readers about both World Wars are not dumbed down or schmaltzy; rather they are rooted in facts and documentary realism. This one is dedicated to Violette Szabo, a real spy from the Second World War who, at age twenty-three, was executed at Ravensbruck concentration camp in February, 1945.

ARRIVAL IN BRITISH COLUMBIA: 1991

CITY OF RESIDENCE: Lantzville

EMPLOYMENT OTHER THAN WRITING: occasional teaching

AWARDS: Shortlisted for Sheila A. Egoff Award, Geoffrey Bilson and Norma Fleck Awards

BOOKS:

A Dangerous Game (Doubleday 2016) $14.99 978-0-385-68307-4
The Missing Skull (Orca 2016) $9.95 978-1-45981-1584
Lost (Orca 2016) $9.95 9781459811959
And In the Morning: Fields of Conflict—The Somme, 1916 (Heritage House 2014) $12.95 978-1-772030-14-3
Broken Arrow - The Seven Sequels (Orca 2014) $10.95 9781459805408
Wings of War (Doubleday 2014) $12.99 978-0-385-67830-8
Bones (Orca 2014) $9.95 9781459806986
Graves of Ice: The Lost Franklin Expedition, George Chambers The Northwest Passage, 1845 (Scholastic 2014) $14.99 978-1-4431-0794-5
Stolen (Orca 2013) $9.95 978-1-4598-0375-6
Victorio's War (Orca, 2012) $12.95 9781554698820
Lost Cause (Orca, 2012) $9.95 9781554699445
Failed Hope (Dundurn, 2012) $18.99 978-1459703452
Victorio’s War (Orca 2012) $12.95 9781554698820 (Wilson's 32nd title for juveniles, teens and adults)
Ghost Moon (Orca 2011). $12.95 978-1-551469-270-5
Shot at Dawn (Scholastic, 2011) 978-0-545-98595-6 $14.99
Written in Blood (Orca, 2010)
Grail: The Heretic's Secret, Book II (Key Porter, 2010)
Bitter Ashes: The Story of WWII (Napoleon, 2010)
And in the Morning (Key Porter, 2010, previously published by Kids Can Press, 2003)
Crusade: The Heretic's Secret, Book 1 (Key Porter, 2009)
Death on the River (Orca, 2009)
Ghost Mountains and Vanished Oceans: North America from Birth to Middle-Age, with Ron Clowes (Key Porter, 2009)
Lost in Spain (Key Porter, 2009, previously published by Fitzhenry & Whiteside, 2000)
Where Soldiers Lie (Key Porter, 2008)
Desperate Glory: The Story of WWI (Napoleon, 2008)
The Alchemist's Dream (Key Porter, 2007)
Where Soldiers Lie (Key Porter, 2006)
Red Goodwin (Ronsdale Press, 2006)
Four Steps to Death (Kids Can Press, 2005)
Battle Scars (Kids Can Press, 2005)
The Flags of War (Kids Can Press, 2004)
Dancing Elephants and Floating Continents: The Story of Canada Beneath Your Feet (Key Porter, 2003)
Flames of the Tiger (Kids Can Press, 2003)
Adrift in Time (Ronsdale, 2003)
Discovering the Arctic: The Story of John Rae (Napoleon. 2003)
Ghosts of James Bay (Beach Holme, 2001, now available through Dundurn)
Righting Wrongs: The Story of Norman Bethune (Napoleon, 2001)
John Franklin: Traveller on Undiscovered Seas (XYZ, 2001, now available through Dundurn)
Norman Bethune: A Life of Passionate Conviction (XYZ, 1999, now available through Dundurn)
North With Franklin: The Lost Journals of James Fitzjames (Fitzhenry & Whiteside, 1999)
Weet Alone (Napoleon, 1999)
Weet's Quest (Napoleon, 1997)
Across Frozen Seas (Beach Holme, 1997, now available through Dundurn)
Weet (Napoleon, 1995)

blog: http://johnwilson-author.blogspot.com

[Alan Twigg / BCBW 2016] "Kidlit" "War" "Biography"

Ghosts of James Bay (Beach Holme)
Info



Following biographies of Norman Bethune and Sir John Franklin for youths, John Wilson’s Ghosts of James Bay (Beach Holme) features time travel and an encounter with the doomed explorer Henry Hudson.

[BCBW WINTER 2001]


John Franklin (XYZ Publishing)
Info



The latest from John Wilson of Lantzville is a biography, John Franklin (XYZ Publishing), the British Naval explorer who died with all his men in search of the Northwest Passage in 1845.

[BCBW SUMMER 2001]


Lost in Spain (F&W $11.95)
Info



In Lost in Spain (F&W $11.95) a family vacation turns deadly when Ted’s political activist father slips into the war-zone to witness firsthand the conditions of the Spanish Civil War and, shortly after, Ted’s mother is badly injured in a street riot. Can a fifteen-year-old boy, and a young Spanish girl, survive the war-ravaged countryside in their desperate search for Ted’s father? John Wilson has also written another book for young readers about the most famous of the hundreds of Canadian volunteers who went to Spain during the Civil War in Norman Bethune: A Life of Passionate Conviction. 1-55041-5239

[BCBW Summer 2000]


North with Franklin: The Lost Journals of James Fitzjames (F&W)
Info



Human remains, equipment scattered over frozen shoreline, cannibalism and a crew driven mad by the lead used to seal their food: John Wilson’s first novel for adults, North with Franklin: The Lost Journals of James Fitzjames (F&W), based on an officer’s letters, re-enacts the disastrous Arctic expedition of 1845 under Sir John Franklin. Wilson lives in Nanaimo. 155041-4062

[BCBW AUTUMN 1999]


Across Frozen Seas (Beach Holme $8.95)
Info



The adventures of David Young, a boy on the 1845 Franklin expedition from London, collide with modern-day Dave Young in Humboldt, Saskatchewan, in Across Frozen Seas (Beach Holme $8.95), the third young adult title by Lantzville's John Wilson. When tragedy strikes in this time travel tale, the friendship of the 'two Davids' is put to a test.
0 88878 381 7

[BCBW 1997]


Flames of the Tiger (Kids Can $7.95)
Article



Former geologist John Wilson of Nanaimo continues to produce books at a dizzying pace. Among his five new titles this year is a novel, Flames of the Tiger (Kids Can $7.95), about a German teenager who is initially seduced by the pomp of Hitler’s rise. With Berlin in ruins and the Russian army on its way, he helps a badly wounded Canadian soldier, telling the man his life story to help keep him conscious. As dawn breaks, the soldier recovers and helps Dieter and his sister survive. Details in Flames of the Tiger—like flaming horses running in terror and a soldier’s description of Belsen—are not for the squeamish.

“It is not my intention to apologize for the Nazis,” says Wilson. “They, and particularly the SS, richly deserve the abhorrence that the civilized world feels for the values they held and the atrocities they committed. What I have tried to do is imagine what it was like for those who came of age in the 1930s and ‘40s, indoctrinated from earliest days and swept up in circumstances they could never understand. To have been a teenager in Nazi Germany must have been immensely difficult, and to expect one to have had a rational post-war perspective is unreasonable. The lure of uniforms and flags and the flood of propaganda must have been next to irresistible. Dieter is probably exceptional for questioning as much as he does.”

Wilson says if there’s an underlying message for his adventure story, it’s to always question what people tell you is a self-evident truth, especially when everyone tells you the same thing. Viewers of CNN, take note. Wilson’s other YA adventure novel is Adrift in Time (Ronsdale $9.95) about a teenager who rebels against his father on Mayne Island. Flames 1-55337-619-6 Adrift 1-55380-007-9

[BCBW Winter 2003]


Red Goodwin (Ronsdale $9.95)
Article



After 18 titles for young readers about complex political situations abroad,John Wilson has brought his fiction formula close to home with Red Goodwin (Ronsdale $9.95), an introduction to the life and times of the socialist folk hero Ginger “Red” Goodwin who was forced to seek refuge in the woods around the coal mining community of Cumberland due to his activities as a union organizer.

Following the death of his father in World War I, young Will Ryan is sent to live with his uncle, a mine manager at Cumberland on Vancouver Island. Will’s chance meeting with the outlaw Red Goodwin in the forest prompts him to consider the legitimacy of the miners’ unionized protests and Goodwin’s radical view that the conflict between Britain and Germany has capitalist origins. Along the way Will befriends a Chinese boy and learns about racism, and he falls in love with a beautiful Scottish girl whose family is helping Goodwin survive in the woods.
Wilson’s preceding young adult novel Four Steps to Death (Kidscan $19.95) revisits the horrific encounter between the troops (and egos) of Hitler and Stalin during the battle and siege of Stalingrad, 1942-1943. Resulting in more than one million deaths, this 229-day impasse was the turning point in World War II, after which the Germans never won a major battle. Wilson revisits the city now known as Volgograd through the experiences of a German tank commander named Conrad, a patriotic Russian soldier named Vasily and an eight-year-old boy named Sergei who tries to survive in the rubble.

In an afterword, Wilson notes the starving and freezing remnants of the German army under Field Marshall von Paulus finally surrendered on February 2, 1943. “The dead were burned in piles on the open steppe and the survivors marched off to a captivity from which few returned,” he writes. The battle of Stalingrad remains under-acknowledged in the West because American, British and Canadian troops did not participate.

Wilson’s forthcoming young adult novel is Where Soldiers Lie (Key Porter $15.95). Set in the exotic world of British Imperial India, it charts the adventures of Jack O'Hara through the tumultuous summer of 1857. With barely time to adjust to his new world after being wrenched from his home in Canada, Jack is plunged into mutiny, siege and massacre. Jack manages to make new friends, but will any of them survive?

Red 1-55380-034-6; Four Steps 1-55337-704-4;
Where Soldiers Lie 1-55263-790-6

[BCBW 2006] "Labour"


Shot at Dawn (Scholastic Canada $14.99)
Interview



John Wilson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1951, of parents who had recently returned from a life in India. He grew up on the Isle of Skye and in Paisley, near Glasgow, and earned an Honours B.Sc. in geology from St. Andrews University. In 1975, he went to work for the Geological Survey of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) but, unwilling to consider military service there, he eventually resettled in Calgary, working in gas and oil exploration.
In 1986, as a geologist in Edmonton, he decided he wasn’t travelling enough, so he sold his sports car, took a leave of absence and set off west. His grand tour took him to Japan, Thailand, the India of his parents, Nepal, Egypt, Zimbabwe and much of Europe. Returning home, he had difficulty adjusting back into a regular work schedule. A feature article, sold to the Globe and Mail, pointed him in a new direction, so he quit his job and became a full-time freelancer before moving on to novels and non-fiction books.
“As a teen growing up in the west of Scotland in the 1960s,” Wilson says, “my primary concerns were staying out of trouble at school (not always successfully) and avoiding the gangs that hung around downtown on Saturday nights. I was a good sprinter!
“I had no intention of trying to emulate the boring dead people we were forced to read in English class.”
Wilson has now been a full-time writer for twenty years and boasts a bibliography that includes hundreds of articles, essays, photo essays, poetry, reviews, 22 novels and eight non-fiction books for teens and adults. His most recent book is Shot at Dawn (Scholastic Canada $14.99).

BC BOOKWORLD: How did the metamorphosis from troubled teen to writer come about?

JOHN WILSON: History. I had a history teacher in grade 11 who told stories about the past. My favourite lesson was about the day Franz Ferdinand was shot in 1914. I lay awake half that night imagining I was one of the characters in Sarajevo that day. What would I have done? How would I have felt, either pointing the gun at Franz or seeing the assassin point the gun at me?

I never wrote anything down but I was already a writer. That’s all I do now. Instead of lying in the dark making up stories, I sit at my computer, but I’m still a small boy trying to travel in time.

BCBW: Do you do a lot of research for your novels?

WILSON: Occasionally, I’ve been lucky enough to receive a grant from the Canada Council to go to archives and read old letters and documents, but mostly I use my holidays. For the trilogy I’m working on, called The Heretic’s Secret, I went to France to see the castles and medieval towns where I set the story.

Also, the internet can be a great resource for details. For example, in Written in Blood, I needed to know about hand guns in the American southwest in 1877. There are websites that specialize in exactly that.
For my most recent book, Shot at Dawn, set in the First World War, I realize I’ve been reading books on WWI ever since my history teacher told me about Franz Ferdinand. I’ve spent the last forty years researching that book.

BCBW: There’s violence in your books, I’m thinking of the prisoner having his toes cut off with rusty shears in Death on the River. Is it necessary?

WILSON: There is violence in some of my books, but none of it is made up or gratuitous. The guy in Death on the River is based on a man who really did have his toes cut off that way. The history of our species is violent and we have to acknowledge that. To paint the past as a pleasant, peaceful progression towards the present, hardly prepares a kid for living in the real world.

BCBW: What about the argument that gross or violent books simply pander to the baser side of the reader’s nature and that boys should be encouraged to read better literature? Would you say boys need different kinds of books from girls?

WILSON: Absolutely. There are countless definitions of what makes a good kids’ book. The only definition that really matters where boys are concerned is: a good book for a boy is any book he will read.

When people question me about violence in my books, I say: If a boy gets bored with one of my books, he’s not going to put it down and read Anne of Green Gables. Odds are he’s going to go and play a video game where he can make people’s heads explode. Call of Duty’s my competition. I have to hold my reader’s interest before I can even think about doing anything else, such as putting the violence in a moral context.

BCBW: Shot at Dawn is part of Scholastic’s new series for boys, I Am Canada. Do you think enough is being done in Canada to interest boys in reading?

WILSON: The situation’s improving. There are a lot of authors writing books for boys, such as Eric Walters, Art Slade and Iain Lawrence, but go into any Chapters store and stand a metre or two away from the Teen Fiction shelves. The predominant colour is pink. I have a seventeen-year-old son who would have his fingernails pulled before he took a pink book off a shelf, regardless of how good that book might be.

BCBW: So there’s a marketing problem for boys?

WILSON: Partly. After all, it makes sense from a marketing perspective to target the easiest demographic, but not if it’s at the expense of the readers who are a tougher sell. Anyone involved in children’s literature—authors, editors, publishers, booksellers, marketers—has a responsibility to all readers, even the ones who would rather be playing video games.

BCBW: Did you read violent books when you were a teen, and if so, what?

WILSON: As a kid I read horror stories, H.P. Lovecraft, science fiction, Asimov, Bradbury, Wyndham, and a lot of historical non-fiction. At that time, the stories from the Second World War—fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain, prisoners escaping from Colditz—were coming out and I devoured them.

I didn’t actually need a graphic description of mayhem. A suggestion was often enough to feed the part of me that lay awake at night making up stories. And the stories I made up were way more violent that anything I write now.

I would read any book that took me to a different place, anywhere that was more exciting than the real world I was stuck in. Essentially, now I’m writing the stories that I wanted to read as a teen, and hoping that they will help today’s teens to escape.

Shot at Dawn: 9780545985956

[BCBW 2011]



Lost Cause — Seven: The Series by John Wilson (Orca $9.95)
Article (2012)



Origin of the Series

Seven: The Series [see story below] was born when Eric Walters started thinking about a story in which a beloved grandfather dies and leaves his grandson the task of spreading his ashes from the top of Mount Kilimanjaro... Then he wondered what if he had more than one grandson? What if he had seven?

“I thought about my favourite writers and their different styles and wondered how each writer would approach this same narrative,” Walters says.

“I made some phone calls. Some of the writers plunged in before the end of the call. Others needed a day to think it over.

“In quick succession though, all seven of us signed on and we were off. Instantly, messages started to fly between the writers as we crafted our individual stories and then 'reshaped' aspects to fit in with what the others were writing.

“For my book, I climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. There, atop the mountain, I sent a text message to John Wilson, just as the character in my book sends one to the character in John's book.
“I can only hope that the readers will enjoy these unique books as much as we all enjoyed writing them.”

You’ve heard of the Magnificent Seven and The Seven Samurai. And Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. And Seven Wives for Seven Brothers.

Now along comes Seven: The Series, for readers aged ten and up—seven novels by seven writers released simultaneously, all involving quests for seven grandsons
as laid out in their grandfather’s will.
The eldest grandson has the task of spreading grandpa’s ashes atop Mt. Kilimanjaro, as outlined in Between Heaven and Earth (Orca) by Eric Walters, who brought the series idea to the publisher.

The seven novels can be read in random order. The contemporary action of each book occurs at the same time as the seven grandsons are dispersed around the world according to their grandfather’s instructions.

Electronic chapters are being made available each month, for seven months, prior to the official release date of October 10.

The lone B.C. author in the series is John Wilson with Lost Cause (Orca $9.95), in which grandson Steve investigates his grandfather’s activities in Spain with the International Brigades during the Spanish Civil War.

“I was approached by Eric early in the process,” he says, “and we decided to make our characters twins. Their relationship is established early in both books and develops through exchanged texts as they undertake their adventures.

“This is an exceptional case with the Seven books. The only point of commonality is reading where each character is given their task/quest. After that, the stories go their own ways as envisaged by each author.
“Obviously, I have read Between Heaven and Earth. I can’t speak for the other authors, but I plan to read all the books. I’m intrigued to see the different directions taken by my colleagues.

Wilson says he’s in awe of Sarah Harvey, who edited all seven books and who undertook the task of making sure that everything in each book fitted with what the other six characters did in the other books.

Lost Cause, for John Wilson, is an attempt, like most of his historical fiction, to relive a time for which he was born too late. “I have long been convinced that, had I been 20 in 1936, I would have gone to fight in Spain in the International Brigades.
Fortunately, since so few came back from that war, I never had the chance. Steve is me, reliving the experiences I wish I could have been a part of.”
978-1-55469-944-5

[BCBW 2012]

Obsessed with World War One
Essay (2014)


from John Wilson
We asked prolific author John Wilson why books about war are so important. He would know.

For his honeymoon, the Wilsons spent much of their time visiting war memorials in Europe.

Much of John Wilson’s time in the last year has been spent living in the wartime past. He has been preparing his World War One book for republication, And in the Morning (Heritage House), researching a series of WWI novels, Tales of War (Doubleday) and reading original soldiers’ diaries at the Canadian War Museum for an upcoming non-fiction book (Tundra), as well as writing a blog to mark the anniversary of World War One.

Here is what he told us:

--

The other day I was having a phone conversation with a publisher concerning an upcoming non-fiction book on WWI. We were talking about possible publication dates to tie in with significant anniversaries and eventually came to a conclusion. “Okay,” I said, “the spring of 1917 should work well.”

There was a silence on the other end of the line. This wasn’t the only time that I recently got dates wrong by 100 years. I don’t have some strange form of historical Alzheimers. The problem is my obsession with history, and WWI in particular.

I was born only 33 years after the end of the Great War. While I was growing up in Scotland, the mutilated survivors of that war, many only in their fifties and sixties, were a very visible part of the cultural landscape, but I paid little attention to them. My heroes growing up were from a more recent war: Spitfire pilots in the Battle of Britain, Commandoes storming enemy beaches, escaped POWs, and spies eluding Gestapo torturers in occupied Europe.

It was only when I began reading war memorials that I realized there was something different about this older war.

Every little village in the west of Scotland has its war memorial. They were erected in the 1920s and 30s and range from a bronze soldier to a plain column. The plinth at the base usually has “Lest We Forget 1914-1918” carved on the front and this is followed by a list of names, often 30 or more, commemorating the young men from the surrounding area who went to war and never returned. On the back there is sometimes a similar, more recent carving memorializing the dead from the war my heroes fought in—but it usually only has two or three names carved on it.

Even to my teenage mind, there was something very different about this first war. I began reading about it and gradually realized the huge cultural impact that war had. In some cases, the names on the fronts of the memorials represented 1 in 5 or 6 of the young men from that area. For these villages, and for Europe in general, these losses and the manner in which they occurred, were an almost unimaginable catastrophe. Everything changed because of what was recorded on those memorials. Before 1914 was history, a ghostly world of memory hardly more real than the Renaissance, after it was recognizable as the world I, and you, live in.

On my honeymoon, my wife realized what she had signed up for when I took her on a cycling tour of the Somme battlefields and pointed out encouragingly which wood the soldiers of 1916 had marched from and where the machine-guns that slaughtered them had been placed. Since then I have dragged my family up mountains to examine Cathar castles in France, trudged up Cemetery Ridge at Gettysburg, and stood on countless hilltops imagining battles, both vast and small, ebbing and flowing around me. But, because of those village memorials from my childhood, I always return to the Somme, Ypres, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Amiens, Verdun.

I want to travel in time, to visit the lost world of 1914 and experience the events that destroyed it and created my world of today. That’s what I spend my life trying to do. Every story I write is more than just a book for other people to read, it is an attempt to recapture the past in my mind, to travel in time, and for the reader, I hope, an invitation to join me on my journey.
I have travelled to the First World War four times so far and I have more trips planned. Each time I go to somewhere different and somewhere other people rarely go.

My first journey was And in the Morning, published by KidsCan Press in 2003 and reissued in 2014 by Heritage House. In many ways, it is my personal favourite. The cover of the original edition featured the face of my wife’s great uncle, an eighteen-year-old boy who died at the battle of Loos on September 25, 1915. And in the Morning is also a diary, based on many actual diaries researched in the Imperial War Museum in London, but ultimately my diary, or at least the one I might have written as a teenager between 1914 and 1916.

My second fictional journey was Shot at Dawn (Scholastic’s I am Canada Series, 2011) and it deals in more depth with issues touched on in And in the Morning, mainly Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or Shell Shock as it was called back then. It is also a diary of sorts, the memories of a young soldier, Allan McBride, in 1918 as he waits in a shed the night before he is due to be executed for cowardice.

Then, in Wings of War (book 1 in Doubleday’s Tales of War Series), I visited the flyers in WWI, not Billy Bishop and the Red Baron, but the early fliers of 1915 and 1916. These were some of the boys who learned to fly in homemade aircraft on prairie farms in 1913 and 1914, and who, when they went to war, had to struggle with the uncertain technology as much as the enemy.

Book 2 in the Tales of War Series, Dark Terror, will be published in 2015 and tells the story of a young Newfoundland miner digging tunnels deep beneath the enemy trenches. Book 3 has no name yet and the journey is not yet complete, but it will tell of a young Belgian nurse recruited into spying for the Allies.

Not all my trips back are fiction, Desperate Glory: The Story of WWI (Dundurn, 2008) is non-fiction. With the extensive use of historic photographs, sidebars and short explanatory texts segments, it does exactly what the title promises, tells the story of the war.

My newest project is different, because for the first time it is not primarily my journey. Tentatively titled, An Artist’s War: The Illustrated WWI Diary of Russell Hughes Rabjohn (Tundra) it is the book that I told my publisher should come out in 1917. Rabjohn was a draughtsman and drew what he experienced between 1916 and 1919. He also kept five volumes of written diary and it is my job to combine these elements to tell his story, not mine.

I have come to understand and learned to live with my obsession. No, that’s not true, I love my obsession, I embrace it and I am eternally grateful that I have lived long enough to see the 100th anniversary of my favourite piece of history. Over the next four years I can wallow in my obsession, give it free rein and not appear too out of place. Welcome to 1914.

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Born in Edinburgh in 1951, John Wilson, grew up on the Isle of Skye and in Paisley, near Glasgow. He now lives on Vancouver Island where he has written 39 books for both young adults and adults.

And In the Morning: 978-1-772030-14-3
Wings of War: 978-0-385-67830-8

Visit John Wilson at: the-war-to-end-wars.blogspot.ca