FRANKLIN, Jill (aka Satya Bharti)




Author Tags: Advice, Religion

DATE OF BIRTH: January 12, 1942

PLACE OF BIRTH: New York City

ARRIVAL IN CANADA: 1985

ARRIVAL IN BRITISH COLUMBIA: same

BOOKS:

Auto Accident Survivor's Guide for BC: Navigating the medical-legal-insurance system, Stone Mountain Books, 2005

The Promise of Paradise, Station Hill Press, 1992

Drunk on the Divine, Grove Press, 1980

The Ultimate Risk, Wildwood House, 1980

Death comes Dancing, Routledge, 1981

BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS: Jill Franklin of Vancouver grew up in Mount Vernon, New York and was educated at Brown University and Sarah Lawrence College. She left her family to become a disciple of Bhagwan (Osho) Ragneesh for thirteen years and became the editor and compiler of his widely-read books Meditation: The Art Of Ectasy and The Psychology Of The Esoteric. She wrote two books about Rajneesh under the pen name Satya Bharti, Death Comes Dancing and Drunk On The Divine. She subsequently recalled her personal odyssey in and out of the Rajneesh movement with her memoir, The Promise Of Paradise (1992). Franklin immigrated to Canada in 1985 and became a Canadian citizen. She has also been a U.S. presidential candidate's speechwriter, and has worked as a para-legal, run meditation and therapy groups, lectured at universities and professional conferences, and managed a large vegetarian food service facility that fed over 2,000 people a day. A serious auto accident in Vancouver in 1990 compelled her to research and write Auto Accident Survivor's Guide for BC. She and her husband have two daughters and four grandchildren. Their son was murdered in 1987.

[BCBW 2005] "Religion" "Advice"

Auto Accident Survivor's Guide for BC
Info (2005)



“Odd where life takes us,” muses Jill Franklin. After a very serious auto accident in 1990, she has written the Auto Accident Survivor's Guide for BC: Navigating the Medical-Legal-Insurance System (Stone Mountain Books, $27.95), a comprehensive look at how injured citizens can avoid further maltreatment by professionals and bureaucracies. When ICBC maintained Franklin was not entitled to compensation for lost income because she was a writer, the likes of Margaret Atwood, Pierre Berton, Jane Rule and Daniel Francis successfully came to her defence. A rehab therapist then suggested she write about confronting the complexities and abuses of B.C. legal-insurance system. It took her seven years to complete the task. “The book isn’t intended to be a substitute for professional advice,” she cautions. “It should be used solely as a consumer advocacy guide.” Every eleven minutes someone in B.C. is injured or killed in an auto accident. 0-9736611-0-0