ROGOW, Sally




Author Tags: Kidlit & Young Adult, War

Sally Rogow has developed and directed a graduate program for B.C. teachers working with students who are blind, visually impaired and/or have multiple disabilities. Working with children led her to admire their courage, resulting in an inspirational collection of 12 stories about teenagers in Europe who resisted the Nazis during World War II. Among the heroes and heroines are Jacques, a blind French teen who organized a student resistance group; Yojo, a Gypsy who guided downed British pilots over the Pyrenees Mountains; Kirsten, a Danish girl who helped Jewish children defy the Nazis; and the 'Eidelweiss Pirates', a group of German teenagers who opposed the Hitler Youth. Three of the stories are based on actual teenagers, including Jacques Lusseyran, the blind resistance leader who later wrote a book called And There Was Light. Born in Paris in 1924, he was physically blinded by a collision at school at age eight. At age 16, during the German occupation, he headed a resistance movement of 600 French youth. Betrayal led to his arrest and imprisonment at Buchenwald. He survived and wrote several books in which his own blindness is interpreted as a spiritual advantage. "Lusseyran," wrote Oliver Sacks, "sees the 'task' of blindness as reminding us of our other, deeper modes of perception and their mutuality."

In addition to Rogow's dramatizations based on historical events and circumstances, she has published a monograph, Hitler's Unwanted Children: The Story of Children with Disabilities in Nazi Germany (1999). It appears in the Journal of Holocaust Education. In her collection Faces of Courage, Rogow has reprinted the following quotation from Adolph Hilter about his Hitler Youth groups. "I want a brutal, domineering, fearless, cruel youth. Youth must be all that. It must bear pain. There must be nothing weak and gentle about it. The free, splendid beast of prey must once again flash from its eyes. That is how I will eradicate thousands of years of human domestication. That is how I will create the New Order."

They Must Not Be Forgotten: Heroic Catholic Priests and Nuns Who Saved People From The Holocaust (Holy Fire Publishing, 2005) is Rogow's compilation of true stories of rescue during World War II. Rogow's documentation of the heroism of priests and nuns has been recognized and honoured by the Yad Vashem and the Catholic church.

Born in New York City, Rogow is both a Canadian and U.S. citizen. She obtained a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin, an M.A. in Anthropology from Columbia University, an M.A. in Special Education from Michigan State and an Ph.D in Education from University of British Columbia in 1971. She is now Professor Emerita of the Faculty of Education of the Univesity of British Columbia. She also taught at Simon Fraser University and at the Michigan School for the Blind. After her retirement from UBC, Rogow became project director of 'The Person Within,' a program to prevent abuse and neglect of children and young people with disabilities.

CITY/TOWN: Vancouver, B.C.

PLACE OF BIRTH: New York City

ARRIVAL IN CANADA: June, 1966

ANCESTRAL BACKGROUND: American

EMPLOYMENT OTHER THAN WRITING: University teaching

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Language, Literacy and Chidren with Special Needs (Toronto: Pippin Publishing, 1997),.

Helping the Visually Impaired Child with Developmental Problems (New York: Columbia University, New York Teachers College Press, 1988).

Exceptional Children in Canada (Toronto: Prentice Hall, 1986). With M. Winzer and C. David.

Lillian Wald: The Nurse In Blue (Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1966)

(For young people)

They Must Not Be Forgotten: Heroic Catholic Priests and Nuns Who Saved People From The Holocaust (Holy Fire Publishing, 2005)

Faces of Courage: Young Heroes of World War II (Granville Publishing, 2003 $16.95)

Rosa Minoka Hill (Native Woman Physician, 1970)

[BCBW 2006] "Kidlit" "War"

Faces of Courage (Granville Publishing $16.95)
Article



Having developed a graduate program for B.C. teachers working with students who are blind, visually impaired and/or have multiple disabilities, Sally Rogow has grown to admire the courage of children. This admiration led her to write Faces of Courage (Granville Publishing $16.95), a collection of 12 stories about teenagers in Europe who resisted the Nazis during World War II. Among the heroes and heroines are Jacques, a blind French teen who organized a student resistance group; Yojo, a Gypsy who guided downed British pilots over the Pyrenees Mountains; and the ‘Edelweiss Pirates’, a group of German teenagers who opposed the Hitler Youth.

Three of the stories are based on actual teenagers, including Jacques Lusseyran, the blind resistance leader who later wrote an autobiography called And There Was Light. Born in Paris in 1924, he was physically blinded by a collision at school at age eight. At age 16, during the German occupation, he headed a resistance movement of 600 French youth. Betrayal led to his arrest and imprisonment at Buchenwald. He survived and wrote several books in which blindness is interpreted as a spiritual advantage. “Lusseyran,” wrote Oliver Sacks, “sees the ‘task’ of blindness as reminding us of our other, deeper modes of perception and their mutuality.”

In addition to Rogow’s dramatizations based on historical events and circumstances, she has published a monograph, Hitler’s Unwanted Children: The Story of Children with Disabilities in Nazi Germany (1999). It appears in the Journal of Holocaust Education. In her collection Faces of Courage, Rogow has reprinted the following quotation from Adolf Hitler about his Hitler Youth groups. “I want a brutal, domineering, fearless, cruel youth. Youth must be all that. It must bear pain. There must be nothing weak and gentle about it. The free, splendid beast of prey must once again flash from its eyes. That is how I will eradicate thousands of years of human domestication. That is how I will create the New Order.”

Sally Rogow was one of the featured writers at the 19th annual Cherie Smith Jewish Book Festival at Vancouver’s Jewish Community Centre in mid-November. Faces of Courage 1-894694-20-1

[BCBW Winter 2003]

They Must Not Be Forgotten
Fact Sheet



The persecution of Jewish people began when Hitler became the dictator of Germany in 1933. Nazi racial laws deprived Jews of their citizenship, stripped them of their civil rights and robbed them of their possessions.

Prison camps were set up shortly after Hitler took power in 1933. The Jewish people were interned during the war. There were three types of camps; death camps, concentration camps and work or labor camps.

In November of 1938, Krystallnacht - The Night of the Broken Glass, took place in Germany. Jewish shops were destroyed by government troops and paramilitary units.

In 1939, at the outbreak of World War II, Jewish people were forced to wear the Star of David. In Eastern Europe, they were robbed of their houses and belongings and forced to live in Ghettos.

Beginning in 1940, Jews in all occupied countries were arrested and deported to concentration camps throughout Europe.

Six Death Camps were set up in occupied Poland in 1941. In 1942, the killing of Jews in gas chambers was underway. Jewish people were also slaughtered by Nazi troops in occupied countries.

5, 962,129 Jewish People were murdered, more than 1,000,000 were young children. 63% of all European Jews were killed.

Country by Country the death rates were as follows: In Poland 3,000,000, Hungary 596,000, France 200,000, and Belgium 36,800 and in Italy 7630.

In Italy 155 Catholic Institutions opened their doors to Jewish Refugees and made it possible for the majority of Jews to be saved from the Holocaust.

In France close to 12,000 children were saved by Priests and Nuns.

In Poland in spite of the fact that assistance to Jewish people was a crime punishable by death, there were Priests and Nuns who hid Jewish children.