PINDER, Leslie Hall




Born in Saskatchewan in 1946, Leslie Hall Pinder earned a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Saskatchewan and graduated from Dalhousie University in Halifax in 1968. She worked as a court recorder in Vancouver before pursuing legal studies at UBC.

After being called to the bar in 1977, she joined a prestigious Vancouver law firm as its first female litigator. The firm held its monthly meetings at a club that did not admit women. When she was asked to use the servants’ entrance, she walked through the front door and into a lot of trouble. Her employment ended.

In 1978 she joined the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs as in-house counsel. By 1982, Pinder formed her own law firm to advance land claims on behalf of her First Nations clients. She retired from her law practice in 2005.

Her first novel, Under the House, culminates in a courtroom scene and exposes ugly secrets beneath a Saskatchewan family's facade of respectability.

Her second novel, On Double Tracks (L&OD 1990), concerns the psychological intricacies of a B.C. Native land claims case.

The Carriers of No is her 1991 chapbook criticizing Judge Allan McEachern's decision against the Gitskan-Wet'suwet'en land claim.

Leslie Hall Pinder’s third novel, Bring Me One of Everything (Grey Swan 2012), blends fiction and fact to examine greed and the expropriation of First Nations artefacts. It opens with a flashback to 1957 when an anthropologist cuts down the largest stand of sacred totem poles in the world for museum display, hoping to salvage the artistic remains of the Haida.

During its launch at the Waldorf Hotel in Vancouver on May 7, First Nations actress Columpa Bobb performed a dramatized part of the novel with directional assistance from Leslee Silverman (Artistic Director, Manitoba Theatre for Young People).

BOOKS:

Under the House (Talon)

On Double Tracks (L&OD 1990) $24.95

The Carriers of No (1991)

Bring Me One of Everything (Grey Swan 2012) $16.95 978-9834900-1-2

35 Stones - poetry

[BCBW 2012]

Bring Me One of Everything (Grey Swan $16.95)
Article (2012)



Saskatchewan-raised Leslie Hall Pinder joined a prestigious Vancouver law firm as its first female litigator in 1977, but this firm held its monthly meetings at a club that did not admit women. Asked to use the servants’ entrance, she walked through the front door. Her employment ended—and her passion for social justice kept growing.

Pinder became the in-house counsel for the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, established her own law firm, and supported land claims for her First Nations clients from 1982 until 2005. She also published two novels and a 1991 chapbook, The Carriers of No, in which she criticized Judge Allan McEachern’s notorious decision against the Gitskan-Wet’suwet’en land claim.

Now her third novel, Bring Me One of Everything (Grey Swan $16.95), blends fiction and fact to examine greed and expropriation of First Nations artefacts. It begins with a flashback to 1957 when an anthropologist cuts down the largest stand of totem poles in the world for a museum display, hoping to salvage the artistic remains of the Haida.

978-9834900-1-2

[BCBW 2012]