MILLER, Bruce G.




Author Tags: Anthropology, First Nations, Law

With an abiding interest in Coast-Salish communities in B.C. and Washington State, UBC anthropologist Bruce Granville Miller has published The Problem of Justice: Tradition and Law in the Coast Salish World (2001) in relation to the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe in Washington State, the Stó:lo Nation and the South Island Tribal Council on Vancouver Island. He has also edited a special issue of B.C. Studies #95 entitled Anthropology and History in the Courts (1992) and published Invisible Indigenes: The Politics of Non-Recognition (2003). The latter examines the methods by which nation-states attempt to manage—and sometimes render invisible—indigenous peoples. Oral History on Trial: Recognizing Aboriginal Narratives in the Courts (UBC Press, 2011) is Miller's examination of how oral histories can be incorporated into the court system, and critique of the Crown's use of Aboriginal materials in key cases.

Review of the author's work by BC Studies:
Be of Good Mind: Essay on the Coast Salish
Extraordinary Anthropology: Transformations in the Field
Invisible Indigenes: The Politics of Non-recognition
Oral History on Trial: Recognizing Aboriginal Narratives in the Courts

BOOKS:

Oral History on Trial: Recognizing Aboriginal Narratives in the Courts (UBC Press, 2011) 978-0-7748-2070-7 $85.00

Miller, Bruce G. Be of Good Mind: Essays on the Coast Salish (UBC Press, 2007). Essay, editor.

Miller, Bruce G. Invisible Indigenes: The Politics of Non-Recognition (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2003).

Miller, Bruce G. The Problem of Justice: Tradition and Law in the Coast Salish World (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001).

Miller, Bruce G. (editor). Anthropology and History in the Courts (Vancouver: Special Issue, B.C. Studies 95, 1992).

PHOTO at right: Cover photo for "Be of Good Mind: Essays on the Coast Salish" (UBC Press, 2007). Essay, editor.

[UBC 2011] "First Nations" "Anthropology"