ROSE, Rachel




Author Tags: Poetry

Rachel Rose is easily one of the most important poets to emerge in B.C. in the early 21st century, having twice received the Pushcart Prize (2014, 2016) and also having won the Pat Lowther Award and the Audre Lorde Award for her third collection, Song & Spectacle (2012).

A dual Canadian/American citizen, Rachel Rose returned to Vancouver with her family after many years in Seattle, Montreal, and Japan. She was appointed Poet Laureate of Vancouver for 2014-2017 on the strength of her relatively small but distinguished output that has been accorded numerous other awards [see below] and critical acclaim.

Rachel Rose was also the librettist for an opera about forbidden love and fundamentalism, When the Sun Comes Out, that premiered in Vancouver in 2013 and was remounted in Toronto in 2014. Having been affiliated with the SFU Writers Studio, Rose has also been published in journals in the U.S. and Canada, including Verse, Poetry, This Magazine, The Malahat Review and The Best American Poetry.

Rachel Rose received her second Pushcart Prize for a poem called 'White Lilies'. It appears in a re-titled version in her fourth collection as 'Living on Islands I'. Awarded since 1976 from the U.S., a Pushcart Prize honours the best "poetry, short fiction, essays or literary whatnot" published by small presses over a preceding year.

Rose's fourth collection, Marry & Burn (2015), has been described as "a searing collection of poems on the subjects of love, loss and addiction." In addition to intimate struggles, she writes about the unexpected heartache of losing an entire hive to the global bee epidemic and reconciliation process that was engendered to heal the wounds of racism in Canada with regards to mistreatment of First Nations constituencies. Marry & Burn was shortlisted for the 2016 Pat Lowther Memorial Award.

DATE OF BIRTH: September 20, 1970

PLACE OF BIRTH: Vancouver, B.C.

OTHER AWARDS: Best American Poetry 2001, A.M. Klein 2000 Award for Poetry, Finalist for the Gerald Lampert Award and the Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal. Winner of the 1997 Bronwen Wallace Award for Fiction and the 1993 Peterson Memorial Prize for Poetry.

BOOKS:

Giving My Body to Science (McGill/Queen's University Press, 1999)
Notes on Arrival and Departure (McClelland & Stewart, 2005)
Song and Spectacle (Harbour, 2012) $18.95 978-1-55017-585-1
Marry & Burn (Harbour 2015) $18.95 978-1-55017-718-3

[BCBW 2016] "Poetry"

Shortlisted for the Audre Lorde Award
Press Release (2013)



Vancouver poet Rachel Rose's latest book, Song and Spectacle (Harbour Publishing, $18.95), has been shortlisted for the prestigious Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry, presented by the Publishing Triangle. This award is given to a poet in Canada or the United States and honours Lorde, an American poet, essayist, librarian and teacher.

Song and Spectacle is the third collection by award-winning poet Rachel Rose, whose craft as a lyricist intersects with a deep notion of the world around her. Her words provoke an awareness of one’s self and, at the same time, create a sense of intimacy with the greater world. She has an extraordinary ability to combine the very personal with the universal. The poems touch on the truths of lesbian motherhood, the effects that suicide has on those left behind, the pains of child birth and the broader questions of myth and science—and the efforts and failures of both to fulfil notions of living and dying.

Rose’s fierce refrains cry out with the joy of being loved and loving—as a mother, child, lover and friend in a nurturing, yet volatile world. Throughout her verse lies a profound respect for the ever-changing body—one that is constantly being sacrificed for love and life, or to death, disease and abuse. Although Rose’s words are penetrating, they are not without a sense of humour and a healthy dose of playfulness.

Rachel Rose is a writer whose work has appeared in journals in Canada, the US, New Zealand and Japan. Her first book, Giving My Body to Science (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1999) was a finalist for the Gerald Lampert Award, the Pat Lowther Award and the Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal, and won the Quebec Writers’ Federation A.M. Klein Award. Her second book, Notes on Arrival and Departure, was published by McClelland & Stewart in 2005. Winner of the Peterson Memorial Prize for poetry and the Bronwen Wallace award for fiction, she holds a BA in English from McGill University and a MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Rachel is currently the poetry and lyric prose mentor at Simon Fraser University.

The winner of the Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry will be announced at an awards ceremony in New York City on April 25th. The other finalists are Wine for a Shotgun by Marty McConnell (EM Press), The Light That Puts an End to Dreams by Susan Sherman (Wings Press) and Port of Call by Davida Singer (Plain View Press).



Shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award
Press Release (2013)



Poet Rachel Rose's latest book, Song and Spectacle (Harbour Publishing, $18.95), has been shortlisted for the prestigious Pat Lowther Memorial Award, presented by the League of Canadian Poets (LCP). The award is given to a female poet in Canada and honours Pat Lowther, whose career was cut short by her untimely death in 1975.

Song and Spectacle is the third collection by award-winning poet Rachel Rose, whose craft as a lyricist intersects with a deep notion of the world around her. Her words provoke an awareness of one’s self and, at the same time, create a sense of intimacy with the greater world. She has an extraordinary ability to combine the very personal with the universal. The poems touch on the truths of lesbian motherhood, the effects that suicide has on those left behind, the pains of child birth and the broader questions of myth and science—and the efforts and failures of both to fulfill notions of living and dying.

Rose’s fierce refrains cry out with the joy of being loved and loving—as a mother, child, lover and friend in a nurturing, yet volatile world. Throughout her verse lies a profound respect for the ever-changing body—one that is constantly being sacrificed for love and life, or to death, disease and abuse. Although Rose’s words are penetrating, they are not without a sense of humour and a healthy dose of playfulness.

Rachel Rose is a writer whose work has appeared in journals in Canada, the US, New Zealand and Japan. Her first book, Giving My Body to Science (McGill/Queen’s University Press, 1999) was also a finalist for the Pat Lowther Award, as well as the Gerald Lampert Award and the Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal. It won the Quebec Writers’ Federation A.M. Klein Award. Her second book, Notes on Arrival and Departure, was published by McClelland & Stewart in 2005. Song and Spectacle, her latest book, is also a finalist for the 2012 Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry. Winner of the Peterson Memorial Prize for poetry and the Bronwen Wallace award for fiction, Rose holds a BA in English from McGill University and a MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Rachel is currently the poetry and lyric prose mentor at Simon Fraser University.

The winner of the Pat Lowther Memorial Award will be announced at the annual LCP Poetry Festival and Conference in Toronto on June 8, 2013. The other finalists are Soul Mouth by Marilyn Bowering (Exile Editions), Monkey Ranch by Julie Bruck (Brick Books), The Book of Marvels by Lorna Crozier (Greystone Books), Slow Curve Out by Maureen Scott Harris (Pedlar Press) and A Grain of Rice by Evelyn Lau (Oolichan Books).

Song and Spectacle (Harbour $18.95)
Article (2014)



Rachel Rose, who won a 2014 Pushcart Prize, has been appointed as Vancouver’s fourth poet laureate. Her most recent collection, Song and Spectacle (Harbour $18.95), won the 2013 Audre Lorde Poetry Prize in the U.S. and the Pat Lowther Award in Canada. She also wrote the libretto for When the Sun Comes Out, Canada’s first lesbian opera, which premiered in Vancouver in 2013 and Toronto in 2014.

As part of her three-year tenure as poet laureate, Rose will champion poetry, language and the arts in Vancouver and will connect established and emerging poets with chefs, urban farmers and other individuals engaged in nourishing citizens to create a collaborative book of poetry inspired by food. “In a city as diverse as Vancouver, there are few subjects that engage us all,” says Rose. “But all of us break bread together, or cook beans or fry noodles. Poetry inspired by food invites poets to write provocative work about the environment, class, immigration and occupation, but it also allows us to celebrate our city’s strengths in a way that brings us together. I look forward to welcoming everyone to the table.”

978-1-55017-585-1


Marry & Burn (Harbour Publishing $18.95)
Article (2016)


from BCBW (Spring 2016)
Rachel Rose was appointed poet laureate of Vancouver for 2014-2017 on the strength of her relatively small but distinguished output that has been accorded numerous awards and critical acclaim.

Now she has received her second Pushcart Prize for a poem in her fourth collection, Marry & Burn. The winning poem ‘White Lilies’ appears in a re-titled version in Marry & Burn as ‘Living on Islands I’.

Described as “a searing collection of poems on the subjects of love, loss and addiction,” Marry & Burn goes beyond intimate struggles to subjects that include the unexpected heartache of losing an entire hive to the global bee epidemic and the reconciliation process to heal the wounds of racism for Canada’s First Nations constituencies.
Easily one of the most important poets to emerge in B.C. in the early 21st century, Rachel Rose has also won the Pat Lowther Award and the Audre Lorde Award for her third collection, Song & Spectacle (2012).

Rose was also the librettist for an opera about forbidden love and fundamentalism, When the Sun Comes Out. It premiered in Vancouver in 2013 and was remounted in Toronto in 2014.
A dual Canadian/American citizen, Rachel Rose was born in Vancouver in 1970. She has returned to Vancouver with her family after many years in Seattle, Montreal, and Japan.

Rose’s other poetry awards include the Best American Poetry 2001, A.M. Klein 2000 Award for Poetry, the 1993 Peterson Memorial Prize for Poetry, and she was a finalist for both the Gerald Lampert Award and the Grand Prix du Livre de Montreal.
978-1-55017-718-3