GILL, Charlotte




Author Tags: Environment, Fiction

Charlotte Gill's memoir of treeplanting, Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber and Life with the Tree Planting Tribe (Greystone 2011) was shortlisted for the Charles Taylor Prize [See below] and then won the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize in 2012 [See below] and the 2012 Non-Fiction Book of the Year Award from the Canadian Booksellers Association, judged by independent booksellers and presented at the 2012 Libris Awards in Toronto. It also received the B.C. National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction.

According to the National Post, "Gill was a tree planter for 17 years, first in Ontario, then in British Columbia; she estimates she has planted one million trees. Today, she teaches in the University of B.C.’s online creative writing program from her new home in Powell River, but she says she misses tree planting every day."

Ladykiller (Thomas Allen, 2005), her first collection of short stories, received the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize and the Danuta Gleed Award in 2006. It was also a finalist for the Governor General’s Award.

Born in London, England, and raised in the United States and Canada, Charlotte Gill of Vancouver is a UBC creative writing graduate whose work has appeared in Best Canadian Stories, The Journey Prize Stories, and many Canadian magazines, and has been broadcast on CBC Radio. Her non-fiction has been nominated for Western and National Magazine Awards.

Review of the author's work by BC Studies:
Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber and Life with the Tree-Planting Tribe

BOOKS:

Ladykiller (Thomas Allen, 2005)

Eating Dirt: Deep Forests, Big Timber and Life with the Tree Planting Tribe (Greystone Books in association with the David Suzuki Foundation, 2011). (Cloth ISBN 978-1-55365 977-8, Ebook ISBN 978-1-55365-793-4, $29.95) Paperback, (Greystone Books in association with the David Suzuki Foundation, 2012) $19.95 978-1-55365-792-7

[BCBW 2012]

Danuta Gleed Award
Press Release (2006)



The Writers’ Union of Canada and John Gleed are pleased to announce that Charlotte Gill is the recipient of the $10,000 DANUTA GLEED LITERARY AWARD for Ladykiller (Thomas Allen Publishers). Judged the best first English-language collection of short fiction by a Canadian author published in 2005.

The Judges Greg Hollingshead, Dave Margoshes and Judith McCormack said of their first choice, “Ladykiller, is a startling collection of stories that explores some of the darker undercurrents of urban existence. Charlotte Gill’s characters – reckless, restless, predatory, self-destructive and stuck in relationships and situations they don’t know they’ve chosen – inhabit a bleak emotional landscape where being angry is the only way they can feel anything at all as they inch towards disaster, unable to stop themselves. Gill writes with skill, flare and a certain hard precision, producing mercurial prose. This is a striking debut.”

The DANUTA GLEED LITERARY AWARD is given in celebration of the life of Danuta Gleed, a writer whose short fiction won several awards before her death in December 1996. Danuta Gleed’s first collection of short fiction, One of the Chosen, was posthumously published by BuschekBooks. The Award is made possible through a generous donation from John Gleed; founder of JetForm Inc., in memory of his late wife, and is administered by The Writers' Union of Canada.

For more information, visit www.writersunion.ca.

Eating Dirt shortlisted for the 2012 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction
Press Release (2012)



Vancouver, BC – January 10, 2012. Greystone Books is delighted to announce that Charlotte Gill’s Eating Dirt (Greystone Books in association with the David Suzuki Foundation, Cloth ISBN 978-1-55365-977-8, Ebook ISBN 978-1-55365-793-4, $29.95) has been shortlisted for the 2012 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction.

Jurors Stevie Cameron and Susan Renouf made the announcement on behalf of the three-person jury (which also includes Allan M. Brandt) and read the citation they wrote about Charlotte Gill’s book:

“Only a writer as skilled as Charlotte Gill could make the back-breaking work of planting more than a million seedlings sound like one of life’s essential adventures. In a carefully balanced story of science, business and friendship, and one that is surprisingly unsentimental, Gill shares her love for Canada’s boreal forests, the tragedy of their disappearances and the grueling work involved in replacing them. Reader, you might finish this book feeling relieved you don’t plant trees -- but you will be wishing you could.”

The other four finalists announced by the prize jurors are: Wade Davis, author of Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest, published by Alfred A. Knopf Canada; JJ Lee, author of The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son, and a Suit, published by McClelland & Stewart; Madeline Sonik, author of Afflictions & Departures: Essays, published by Anvil Press; and Andrew Westoll, author of The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary: A Canadian Story of Resilience and Recovery, published by HarperCollins Publishers. The prize consists of $25,000 for the winner and $2,000 for each of the runners up. The winning book will be announced on Monday, March 5th 2012.

About Eating Dirt: Charlotte Gill offers up a slice of tree-planting life in all of its soggy, gritty exuberance, while questioning the ability of conifer plantations to replace original forests that evolved over millennia into complex ecosystems. She looks at logging’s environmental impact and its boom-and-bust history, and touches on the versatility of wood, from which we have devised countless creations as diverse as textiles and airplane parts.

Eating Dirt also eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, which grow from a tiny seed into one of the world’s largest organisms, our slowest-growing “renewable” resource. Most of all, the book joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.



Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize
Prfess Release (2012)




Vancouver, BC – May 14, 2012. Greystone Books is delighted to announce that Charlotte Gill’s Eating Dirt (Greystone Books in partnership with the David Suzuki Foundation, Cloth ISBN 978-1-55365-977-8, Ebook ISBN 978-1-55365-793-4, $29.95) has won the 2012 Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize.

Established in 1985 to celebrate British Columbian writers and publishers, the B.C. Book Prizes are administered by the West Coast Book Prize Society. Winners were announced on Saturday, May 12, 2012 at SFU Woodwards, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, Vancouver. Each category winner was rewarded with a prize of $2,000.

About Eating Dirt: Charlotte Gill spent twenty years working as a tree planter in the forests of Canada. During her million-tree career, she encountered hundreds of clearcuts, each one a collision site between human civilization and the natural world, a complicated landscape presenting geographic evidence of our appetites. Charged with sowing the new forest in these clear-cuts, tree planters are a tribe caught between the stumps and the virgin timber, between environmentalists and loggers. In Eating Dirt, Gill offers up a slice of tree-planting life in all of its soggy, gritty exuberance, while questioning the ability of conifer plantations to replace original forests that evolved over millennia into complex ecosystems. She looks at logging’s environmental impact and its boom-and-bust history, and touches on the versatility of wood, from which we have devised countless creations as diverse as textiles and airplane parts. Eating Dirt also eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, which grow from a tiny seed into one of the world’s largest organisms, our slowest-growing “renewable” resource. Most of all, the book joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.