MORTON, James W.




Author Tags: 1850-1900, Chinese, Early B.C.

James Morton was one of the foremost historians of B.C. during the 1970s, although his book on the Chinese in B.C. has been criticized by historian Anthony Chan as "a classic example of the Chinese-as-victim thesis. Based on newspaper accounts and paternalistic in tone."

Morton's final book about Captain Stamp and Colonel Moody is a worthwhile attempt to capture the flavour of life in the province during the birth of Vancouver as a city--originally known as Granville. Stamp was at the forefront of 19th century efforts to establish a lumber export industry, first on Vancouver Island at Alberni, then in Burrard Inlet. [Photo: Captain Edward Stamp]

Review of the author's work by BC Studies:
In the Sea of Sterile Mountains, The Chinese in British Columbia

BOOKS:

Capilano; the Story of a River (McClelland & Stewart, 1970)

In the Sea of Sterile Mountains, The Chinese in British Columbia (J.J. Douglas, 1974)

The Enterprising Mr. Moody, the Bumptious Captain Stump (J.J. Douglas, 1977).

[BCBW 2003] "Chinese" "Early B.C." "1850-1900"