In 2008, as a UVic history professor, John Sutton Lutz produced Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations (UBC Press $85), including a chapter titled 'Making the Lazy Indian.' This is a superb examination of the collision between indigenous and non-indigenous cultures of British Columbia that received the Harold Adams Innis Prize for the best English language book in the social sciences published in Canada in 2009.

Having spent billions to solve the so-called "Indian problem,"; our society has yet to fully come to terms with what Lutz calls the "white problem"; that emerged in the 1950s when deliberate and also inadvertent policies drove Aboriginals out of capitalist, wage and subsistence economies (ie. fishing). This is one of those rare and wonderful academic books, well-edited and illustrated, that can easily be read from cover to cover by anyone who wants to understand the province in depth.

Keith Thor Carlson, editor of A Stó:l?-Coast Salish Historical Atlas, has dubbed it, "The most important book on the history of West Coast Native-newcomer relations since Robin Fisher's Contact and Conflict."; That's a gi-normous claim, but he could be right. Lutz's engaging overview is one of several swan songs from the desk of retiring UBC Press editor Jean Wilson who helped produce literally dozens of important First Nations-related titles since her arrival at UBC Press in 1988.

The Canadian Historical Association's 2009 Clio Prize for British Columbia was also granted to Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations by John Sutton Lutz (UBC Press).

As an assistant professor of History at UVic, John Sutton Lutz co-edited Situating "Race" and Racisms in Space, Time and Theory: Critical Essays for Activists and Scholars (McGill-Queen's, 2005) with Jo-Anne Lee. As a specialist in indigenous-newcomer relations, he later contributed to, and edited, the proceedings of a February 2002 conference for Myth & Memory: Stories of Indigenous-European Contact (UBC Press, 2007). He is a co-director of the Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History Project.

Reviews of the author's work by BC Studies:
Makuk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations
Researcher's Guide to British Columbia: Nineteenth Century Directories, A Bibliography & Index

BOOKS:

Situating "Race" and Racisms in Space, Time and Theory: Critical Essays for Activists and Scholars (McGill-Queen's, 2005) with Jo-Anne Lee. Co-editor.

Makúk: A New History of Aboriginal-White Relations (UBC Press 2008) 9780774811392

[BCBW 2010] "First Nations" "Indianology"