QUICK REFERENCE ENTRY:

If geography were an Olympic event, they'd accuse Derek Hayes of being on steroids. During the first decade of the new millennium, Hayes compiled, designed and wrote ten atlases and illustrated histories, starting with his self-published Historical Atlas of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest (1999), winner of the Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award. Since that debut, Hayes has won many awards for tracing the exploration and settlement patterns of areas throughout Canada and the U.S.

These were followed by British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas (Douglas & McIntyre, 2012), winner of three major awards: the inaugural Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize, the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize to recognize the author of the book that contributes most to the enjoyment and understanding of British Columbia, and the Lieutenant Governor's Award for best B.C. history book from the B.C. Historical Federation. It was also shortlisted for the Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award presented to the originating publisher and author(s) of the best book in terms of public appeal, initiative, design, production and content.

The first Hayes atlas was followed by Historical Atlas of the North Pacific Ocean (2001) and First Crossing: Alexander Mackenzie, His Expedition across North America, and the Opening of the Continent (2001). With 370 maps charting the growth of Vancouver and its environs, Hayes' sixth large format atlas, and his eighth book, Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley (2005), traces the region's development from the days when the village of Granville, with 30 buildings, was divided into lots in 1882 for a city to be called Liverpool. Hayes received the Lieutenant Governor's Medal for best B.C. history book from the B.C. Historical Federation.

British Columbia was brought into the Canadian Confederation in 1871 in exchange for the promise of a transcontinental line to the West Coast. When the Canadian Pacific Railway arrived in 1886, it bolstered economic development in the province, created the city of Vancouver and spurred others to build competing lines. In his prolifically illustrated Iron Road West (Harbour $44.95) Derek Hayes charts the development of the province through its competitive railway lines and he explores the emergence of the modern freight railway in British Columbia, including fully automated and computerized trains. 978-1-550178388

"I collected stamps as a child,"; Hayes explains, "and I wanted to know where they all came from, hence out came the atlas. Then I got into geography academically, then city planning. I like to think that if a picture is worth a thousand words, a map must be worth ten thousand. Having said that, I would emphasize I try to write history using maps as the primary illustration. This has a wider audience than if I only wrote books about maps.";

FULL ENTRY:

Born in England, Derek Hayes came to UBC to undertake graduate work at the Geography department in 1969, having trained as a geographer at the University of Hull in England. His interest in botanical geography led him to import hobby greenhouses. A greenhouse contact in England then suggested he become the Canadian distributor for a series of gardening books. At first, the gardening titles by experts sold poorly. Then they were spotted at the PNE garden show by an avid B.C. gardener, Bill Vander Zalm, who encouraged the Art Knapp outlets throughout B.C. to carry Hayes' titles. Based in Delta, Cavendish Books subsequently produced more than 100 of its own mainly gardening-related books. This publishing success led Hayes to finally indulge his passion for maps.

In 1999 Hayes published his Historical Atlas of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest (Cavendish). This first atlas received the Bill Duthie Booksellers Choice Award in 2000. "Quite frankly I had no idea that anybody in B.C other than myself was interested in maps,"; said Hayes, upon receiving the prize. "Luckily there were quite a few! The book contains lots of speculative maps about British Columbia because British Columbia is one of the last places in the world, other than the poles, to be put on the map of the world. Cartographers didn't like to have blanks on their maps. If they didn't know what was out there, they made it up. As a result there are some bizarre maps of what is now British Columbia. On one there is a great sea of the west that goes as far as Kansas. On another a Northwest Passage takes off somewhere near Prince Rupert and goes to Hudson's Bay. It's wild and it's woolly.";

Hayes' Historical Atlas of Canada received the 2003 Lela Common Award for Canadian History from the Canadian Authors Association (and a revised edition was published in 2015). It was preceded by a study of Alexander Mackenzie and the Historical Atlas of the North Pacific Ocean (Douglas & McIntyre). "I've been collecting maps for 30 years,"; said Hayes, who says he spent more than $20,000 on reproduction fees. "The Russian ones were particularly difficult to track. It's been like detective work."; The North Pacific atlas provides 235 maps that pertain directly to the territory now known as B.C. and 320 maps in all. Included are the voyages of Vitus Bering, the first map of the entire southern interior of B.C. made by Archibald McDonald in 1827, maps from the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1841, military spy maps of 1845 and 1846, American railroad surveys, British-American Boundary Commission maps, gold rush maps and maps for the purchase of Alaska from the Russians in 1867.

Hayes' British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas (Douglas & McIntyre, 2012) was shortlisted for the inaugural Basil Stuart-Stubbs Prize and the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize to recognize the author(s) of the book that contributes most to the enjoyment and understanding of British Columbia. It was also shortlisted for the Bill Duthie Booksellers' Choice Award presented to the originating publisher and author(s) of the best book in terms of public appeal, initiative, design, production and content.

As an historian who uses maps as an adjunct to his work, Hayes has also produced an illustrated history of Canada, to be followed by a similar work for the United States. He is involved in his own books as a designer, and has won three Alcuin Awards for his work as a packager of his own materials. With 370 maps charting the growth of Vancouver and its environs, Derek Hayes' sixth intensively detailed historical atlas and his eighth book, Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley (D&M $49.95), traces the region's development from the days when Vancouver's predecessor, the village of Granville, with 30 buildings, was divided into lots in 1882 for a city to be called Liverpool. It received the Lieutenant Governor's Medal for best B.C. history book from the B.C. Historical Federation.

The indefatigable Hayes-easily one of the province's leading authors even though you never see him at Writers Festivals-continued his bestselling historical atlas series with Historical Atlas of Early Railways, examining rail travel from its beginnings-when carts caused ruts in roads as early as 2200 BCE-to the 20th century. Some 320 maps and 450 photos trace the evolution of rail travel with Hayes' usual diligence and passion.

British Columbia was brought into the Canadian Confederation in 1871 in exchange for the promise of a transcontinental line to the West Coast. When the Canadian Pacific Railway arrived in 1886, it bolstered economic development in the province, created the city of Vancouver and spurred others to build competing lines. In his prolifically illustrated Iron Road West (Harbour $44.95) Derek Hayes charts the development of the province through its competitive railway lines and he explores the emergence of the modern freight railway in British Columbia, including fully automated and computerized trains.

[Other geography authors of B.C. include Atkeson, Ray; Barnes, Trevor; Berelowitz, Lance; Blomley, Nick; Cameron, Laura Jean; Clapp, C.H.; Forward, Charles N.; Fraser, William Donald; Gregory, Derek; Gunn, Angus; Halseth, Greg; Hardwick, Walter G.; Harris, Cole; Holbrook, Stewart; Kistritz, Ron; Koroscil, Paul M.; Lai, David; Leigh, Roger; McGillivray, Brett; Minghi, Julian; O'Neill, Thomas; Penlington, Norman; Pierce, John; Robinson, J. Lewis; Sandwell, R.W.; Slaymaker, Olav; Townsend-Gault, Ian; Wilson, James W. (Jim); Wynn, Graeme; Yorath, Christopher John.] @2010.

Review of the author's work by BC Studies:
British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas
Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley
Historical Atlas of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest: Maps of Exploration

BOOKS:

Historical Atlas of British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. (Cavendish, 1999). 1-55289-900-4

Historical Atlas of the North Pacific Ocean. (Douglas & McIntyre, 2001).

First Crossing: Alexander Mackenzie, His Expedition Across North America, and the Opening of the Continent. (Douglas & McIntyre).

Historical Atlas of Canada: Canada's History Illustrated with Original Maps (Douglas & McIntyre).

Historical Atlas of the Arctic (Douglas & McIntyre, 2003) 1-55365-004-2 : $75.00.

Canada: An Illustrated History (Douglas & McIntyre, 2004) 1-55365-046-8: $55.00.

America Discovered: A Historical Atlas of Exploration. (Douglas & McIntyre, 2004) 1-55365-049-2 : $65.00

Historical Atlas of Vancouver and the Lower Fraser Valley (Douglas & McIntyre, 2005) 1-55365-107-3

Historical Atlas of the United State (Douglas & McIntyre, 2006). 1-55365-205-3 : $55.00.

Historical Atlas of Toronto (Douglas & McIntyre, 2008).

Historical Atlas of the North American Railroad. (Douglas & McIntyre, 2010). 978-1-55365-553-2 : $49.95.

British Columbia: A New Historical Atlas (Douglas & McIntyre, 2012). $59.95 978-1-926812-57-1

Historical Atlas of Canada: Canada's History Illustrated with Original Maps (Revised Edition) (Douglas & McIntyre, 2015) $34.95 978-1-77162-079-6

Historical Atlas of Early Railways (D&M 2017). $49.95 978-1-77162-175-5

Iron Road West (Harbour 2018) $44.95 978-1-550178388

[BCBW 2018]