The first detective assigned to Vancouver's Missing and Murdered Women Investigation in 1998, Lori Shenher, was a former newspaper reporter with an English Lit degree. Now she has written a tell-all memoir about the Picton debacle in which she lets us know the police were tipped off about Pickton three years before he was finally arrested. Picton was interviewed by police in 2002. Shenher's experiences with VPD resulted in PTSD and her own deep distrust of the police and the criminal justice system. Her book alleges rampant sexism, racism and the mishandling of the largest serial killer investigation in Canadian history. The title is That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away (Greystone $32.95). The book was shortlisted for a Hubert Evans non-fiction prize.

Shenher went through gender reassignment and a name change (from Lori to Lorimer) in his fifties and wrote a book about it: This One Looks Like a Boy: My Gender Journey to Life as a Man. In this memoir, Shenher shares this story, from childhood gender dysphoria to teenage sexual experimentation to early-adult denial and finally acceptance that he is trans.

BOOKS

Shenher, Lori: That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away (Greystone 2015) $32.95 978-1-177164-093-0

Shenher, Lorimer: This One Looks Like a Boy: My Gender Journey to Life as a Man (Greystone 2019) $32.95 978-1-77164-448-8

Review of the author's work by BC Studies:
That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away

[BCBW 2018]